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Author Topic: Pullo In Latin  (Read 50919 times)
Eirene
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« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2006, 07:51:48 AM »

Salvete, lectores!

THis is a special post to congratulate and honor Ray, because of his birthday, which was yesterday, but we're still partying!!!! (Well, I am!!)

Insolent Wretch made a beautiful song for you!

"Happy Birthday to you
You're back from the loo
You look like Adonis
And you shag like him, too."

"Anniversarium felix tibi
E latrina evenisti
Adonidi similis es
Et ut is futuisti!"


Vivat, Crescat, Floreat Raymundus Stephani Filius!!!!!!

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene


 :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer: :cheer:
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InsolentWretch
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« Reply #16 on: May 26, 2006, 08:03:22 AM »

"Happy Birthday to you
You're back from the loo
You look like Adonis
And you shag like him, too."

"Anniversarium felix tibi
E latrina evenisti
Adonidi similis es
Et ut is futuisti!"

Awwww.....Eirene, Thank You!!!

It's much more beautiful in Latin. :swoon:
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Avast ye, Roman Soldier!
Eirene
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« Reply #17 on: May 26, 2006, 08:07:34 AM »

Insy,

It seems that Latin does that ole trick of embellishing anything shaggy, raunchy and racey. I wasn't really aware of that until I started to try the Latin language out on the HBO/Rome boards, this community and several other places where ROME fans meet!
You're very much welcome, dear!!

pluppies,  :-*
Eirene
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"You Shave, I Kiss!" (Season 2, ep.14)

:eirene:

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Eirene
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Gender: Female
Posts: 163


I'm sitting in a bowl of porridge, all night long.


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« Reply #18 on: May 29, 2006, 03:53:04 AM »

Salvete, lectores!

Without any further ado, I would like to head on for the sixth episode of the "Pullo in Latin" series. After this episode, there will be a break in the posting of the series' episodes and Pullo's words in Latin of a few weeks. After that, I will continue posting this stuff. In the meantime, some other Latin goodies regarding Pullo and the ROME series will be posted!

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene

ROME, season 1, episode 6:

M*** off and die, pigf*****.
Fututum confice et obi, porcifututor.

Ah, thank you, my honey.
Ehi, gratias tibi, mellita mea.

Happy again this morning. Niobe, then? How’s she going?
Quam gaudens hodie mane. Ergo, ad Nioben refert. Ut valet?

(Vorenus: I don’t understand her. All ahoo over her sister’s damn husband.)
(Vorenus: Eam non intellego. De sororis marito damnato valde sollicita est.)

Women, eh? Maybe she’s, she’s...?
Ita mulieres sunt, annon? Fortasse…fortasse ...?

(Vorenus: She’s what?)
(Vorenus: Fortasse quid?)

I don’t know. Women, eh!
Nescio. Mulieres, eh!

Out!
Abite!

So, keeping their promises, eh? Caesar and Mark Antony – doing right by the people. That was your worry, wasn’t it? That Caesar would turn out to be just another tyrant sort. But here’s him and Mark Antony getting jobs for the unemployed. Now you can’t complain about that now, can you?

Ergo promissis stantes, annon? Caesar et M. Antonius – benignitatem in populum adhibentes. Haec tua cura fuit, annon? Ut Caesar modo alius tyranni typus esse se praeberet. At ecce ille et M. Antonius laborem hominibus sine negotiis praebentes. Age, illud queri non poteris, annon?

Hey, Mark Antony has his odd ways, there’s no denying that.
Heia, M. Antonius insolitam viam vivendi habet, hoc non recusandum est.

(Vorenus: I’m not going home. I need a drink.)
(Vorenus: Domum non eam. Vino egeo.)

Drink? You?
Vinone? Tune?

(Vorenus: I. Drink. What of it?)
(Vorenus: Ego. Vino egeo. Quid?)

I’ll not argue.
Non dissentiam.

(Vorenus: I thought it was going well for a while, but now…Maybe I should beat her, you think?)
(Vorenus: Nos aliquo tempore bene valere cogitabam, sed nunc…Fortasse eam percuterem, reris?)

Oh, I don’t know. That only works if keep at it. A good thrashing once or twice a day till they’re docile. But then they don’t look so good. Be a shame to mark up a beauty like her.

Eh, nescio. Hoc solum vim habet si continuas. Bonas plagas semel aut bis in dies dum dociles sunt. At tunc non tam pulcrae videntur. Venustati ut ei signum adhibere doleres.

It’s alright, lamb. It’ll be alright.

Satis bene est, agne mi. Satis bene erit.

If there’s no wine, water will do.
Si vinum non adest, aqua sufficiet.

Thank you, my dove.
Gratias tibi, columba mea.

So, Lyde, I was, uh, asking around, y’know, about your man, there. Evander. See if I could find out anything for you. Only, I know a few shady characters, see. Types that might know what’s what when a man’s gone missing. Any road…They tell me that he got himself into some trouble with some nasty Greek boys across the river. Gambling debts, they say.

Ergo, Lyde, em, de marito tuo illo, videsne, Evandro, circumrogavi. Ut videam si quid tibi audirem. Videsne, modo paucos vagos viros cognovi. Figurae quae rem de viro amisso cognovissent. Quoquo modo...Ei aliquas malas res cum vulgaribus Graeculus trans flumen contigisse mihi dixerunt. De debitis in ludo talario, mihi dixerunt.

(Lyde: Gambling? Evander never gambled.)
(Lyde: In ludo talario? Evander numquam talis lusit.)

Well, sure, it’s the sort of thing a man keeps quiet around his wife, innit?
Ehi, certe, hoc est quod vir uxori suae non narraret, annon?

(Lyde: What are you saying?)
(Lyde: Quid mihi dicere vis?)

I’m sorry to say, but it looks like he’s not coming home. Dead, looks like.
Me id dicere pudet, sed domum revenire non videtur. Mortuus est, ut videtur.

(Lyde: Are you sure?)
(Lyde: Certusne de ea re es?)

So they tell me. Dead. Killed.
Hoc mihi dixerunt. Mortuus. Necatus.

(Lyde: It isn’t true.)
(Lyde: Verum non est.)

My advice….Best forget about him. Best get on with your life.
Hoc tibi consulam…Melius est eo oblivisci. Melius vitam tuam continuere.

(Lyde: It isn’t true.)
(Lyde: Verum non est.)

It’s not so bad. You’ve still got people that love you. Look to them, eh. Isn’t that right, Niobe? Best she gets on with her life. Best she looks to people that love her. Forget Evander. Forget the past.
Tam male non est. Adhuc tibi sunt qui te cari habent. Eos cura. Nonne rem teneo, Niobe? Melius est ut vitam continuat. Melius est, ut eos curat, qui eam cari habent. Evandro obliviscere. Tempore praeterito obliviscere.

Well, I’m away. Need a drop of wine to set me up for the day.
Ei, exeo. Pauco vini egeo ut diem incipiam.

(Atia: Titus Pullo, didn’t I tell you to sort that (i.e. Octavius penetrating a woman) out? I’m sure I did.)
(Atia: Tite Pullo, nonne te id (i.e. Octavium mulierem penetrantem) curare iussi? Vere id iussisse certa sum.)

I, um....Sorry, ma’am. I’ll see to it.
Em…Veniam rogo, domina. Id fieri curabo.

(Atia: Do that. (To Octavius) Don’t worry, darling. There’s really nothing to it. Once you’re in the saddle, as it were, it’ll all come naturally. Isn’t that right, Pullo?)
(Atia: Age, id cures. (ad Octavium) Noli metuere, deliciae. Vere actum simplex est. Cum primum quasimodo coire coepisti omnia recta fient. Nonne verum est, Pullo?)

That’s right, ma’am.
Verum est, domina.

(Atia: And none of your sordid soldier she-wolves, mind you. Something clean and pretty.)
(Atia: At nullam sordidam lupam militariam adhibeas, sed aliquam pudicam et pulchram.)

Clean and pretty it is.
Pudicam et pulchram adhibebo.

Coming through. Noble coming through. Make way there. Don’t worry, young master. There’s nothing to it.
Praeterimus. Nobilis praeterit. Agite et discedite. Ne cures, iuvenis domine. Ad nihilum pertinet.

(Octavius: If there’s nothing to it, why is such a fuss made of the thing?)
(Octavius: Si ad nihilum pertinet, cur ista res sic exponitur?)

You’ll soon find out.
Illud cito intelleges.

(Madame: Vai, vai! Be off with you. This is no infantry f*** hole, thank you very much.)
(Lena: Vae, vae! Abire. Hoc peditibus lupanar non est, si titbi placet.)

Now, my honey. Calm your stomach. We’ve come for the young master here. And we’re well coined.
Ahae, desine, mellita mea. Ventre quieto sis. Huic iuveni domino venti sumus. Et pleni pecuniae sumus.

(Madame: Oh! Well, excuse me, of course. I meant no disrespect. We’re honored to service you, young master. And what would be the young master’s pleasure?)
(Lena: Ei! Age, me excusate, scilicet. Aliquem offendere non volui. Honorati sumus ut te serviamus, iuvenis domine. Et quid iuveni domino placeret?)

First timer. Nothing too savory.
Primum lupanar visitat. Nihil nimium faceti adhibes.

A little bit skinny, innit? Won’t know he’s been, will he? Won’t know you’ve been.
Paululum praegracilis, annon? Futuere non cognoverit, nonne verumst? Futuere non cognoveris.

(Octavius: That will be fine.)
(Octavius: Illud mihi bene placet.)

Hold on, young master. No point hurrying. Big decision, this. Let’s have a look at a couple more.
Morare, iuvenis domine. Festinare non interest. Magnus dilectus hic est. Age, aliqua plura aspiciamus.

(Madame: If we might dispense with the pecuniary detail.)
(Lena: Si nunc ad pecuniam transire poterimus?)

Oh. Right. What’s your price, then?
Em, recte. Age, quantum id constat?

(Madame: One thousand)
(Lena: Mille.)

Gerrae! I could have half the whores in Narbo for that. And their mothers.
Gerrae! Narbone illo pretio dimidiam partem omnium luparum et matres suas haberem.

(Madame: We’re not in Narbo....wherever that might be.)
(Lena: Narbone non sumus…ubicumque is locus esset.)

Alright, my dove. We’ll pay. But the girl better f*** him like Helen of Troy with her *ss on fire or I’ll know the reason why.
Satis bene, columba mea. Solvemus. Atqui illa puella eum melius futuat ut Helena Troiana culo accenso aut rem veram cognovero.

Nice place, this. Clean. I don’t suppose…seeing as how I’m with the quality…
Haec domus mihi placet. Nitida. Ehem, non reor…ut constet quomodo qualitas mihi intersit…

(Madame: Not a chance.)
(Lena: Non fiet.)

Mm, there he is. Young Apollo. How was it?
Age, ibi est, iuveis Apollo. Quomodo evenit?

(Octavius: It was…pleasant.)
(Octavius: …Placuit.)

Pleasant. I should say so. How was he?
Placuit. Id exspectassem. Quomodo fecit?

(Egeria: Like bull.)
(Egeria: Ut taurus.)

(to Eirene) You be a good girl. Do as you’re told.
(ad Eirenen) Tu puella lepida sis. Fac sicut iussa eris.

This is cac, this is. I’m wet through.
Hoc est cac, hocce. Madidus sum!

(Vorenus: We’re perfectly safe. A very good offering was made to Triton.)
(Vorenus: Tutissimi sumus. Optimum sacrificium Tritoni datum erat.)

If Triton can’t keep me drier than this, he can s*** my c***.
Si Triton me siiciorem hac re haberes non potest, sopionem meum sugat!

(Vorenus: Why can’t  you learn to keep your fat mouth shut?)
(Vorenus: Quare discere non potes ut pingui bucca taceas?)
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"You Shave, I Kiss!" (Season 2, ep.14)

:eirene:

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Eirene
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« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2006, 04:19:07 AM »

Now that the "Pullo in Latin" series is on vacation for a bit, it's time to deal with some other Latin thingies regarding the ROME series.
Fo some reason, various ROME characters (from prole to pleb to even patrician) us quite strong language, either using (or: abusing) Roman deities or using the Italian language, for some odd reason. Italian is a derivation from Latin, that's right, but lots of other languages have helped to create the Italian language as it is today. From the linguistic point of view, Italian is derivated from Latin as much as English is from a series of Celtic languages and dialects: a lot has happened in between that has had nothing to do with the original language. Hence, it isn't that easy for Italians to learn proper Latin in just a short amount of time. I have experienced this while discussing the matter with many Italians who tried. It's hard for them, maybe just because it seems so easy, especially to them.

Enough dribble. Let's have a look at the Latin. This, for example:

"Juno's c***!":
This strong remark is used by Cato and Pullo in various episodes of the series. As a classicist, I can say that I have never seen such thing in any piece of Latin literature, not even in Roman Comedy, which is pretty saucy most of the time. I therefore doubt that the Romans would ever openly abuse their Queen of Gods in such way, but if we for a moment suppose they did, it would sound like this in Latin:

"Per Iunonis cunnum!"

Then there is the following:

"Porca Juno!", used by Pompeius in the series. This is supposed to be Latin for: "Juno, the pig" or something like that. Juno, the same goddess as stated above, by the way, however, was not connected with pigs, although the pig was a part of the official state sacrifice to the Trias Capitolina (i.e. the Capitoline Triad) Iuppiter, Iuno and Minerva: the pig (sus), sheep (ovis) and bull (taurus) ---> this sacrifice was called "suovetaurilia". But this was an offering to all three divinities as a group and even if Juno received pigs as a sacrifice, I don't think the Romans swore by her name connected with a pig. So, although I don't think that this cuss word would be a reality in ancient Rome, I had to translate it, because it is part of the texts in the ROME series. I translated after the thought that we might deal here with Juno's pig and not Juno as a pig. So, I translated:

"Porca Iunonis" or "Per Iunonis porcam"

The last item in this post is a cry by Marcus Antonius is episode 2 of the series: "Che brutta figura!" (when Cato reminds him of the fact that he is dressed as a military man, while he should be dressed as a citizen within the boundaries of the City). This is Italian. I really don't have a clue why the Italian is used here, other than to serve as a sort of substitute for the Latin language. I have translated it into Latin as such:

"O imago turpis!" ("what an ugly sight!")

Which is the exact translation of "Che brutta figura!"

Well, that's it for now, people!

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene
« Last Edit: June 01, 2006, 04:21:10 AM by Eirene » Logged


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:eirene:

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Eirene
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« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2006, 10:03:04 AM »

Salvete, lectores!

Just a shortie today, to keep things running!

You may wonder how it is possible that Roman men always had (at least) two names and women only one. Well, it's like this. Women were usually only named after their family, so Julia is called like that because she belongs to the Julii, etc. To call Servilia "Servilia of the Junii" isn't proper in Roman use and it has only been done to make clear that Servilia was once married to a man called Junius and hence her son is called Junius (M. Junius Brutus, the infamous murderer of Caesar). The same goes for "Atia of the Julii". She was just called Atia. Servilia, by marriage, became part of the Junii family, but she kept her own name. Atia was connected to the Julii, because her mother, Julia, was a sister of Caesar's.

Now on to the more common women in Rome. Not belonging to a great family, they normally had one simple name: Niobe, Lyde, Eirene. Mostly, they weren't real Roman citizens, but had become citizens by being the descendants of freedmen/-women of foreign origin (i.e. not Roman). Mostly, Niobe and the likes could choose to take on the name of their husband or (former) master as a second name, when they got more important by trade or anything: Niobe Voreni, Lyde Evandris/Pulchionis, Eirene Pullonis. That's why my alter ego on the hbo. com/rome boards is called eirenepullonis, i.e. Eirene Pullonis, which means: "Pullo's Eirene". I am Pullo's Eirene, right?  :-*

Oh, and another thingy: the plural of "Vorenus" isn't "Vorenii" as I have seen people using around here and elsewhere. It's "Voreni".

That's it for now, sweeties!

Pluppies,  :-*

Eirene
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:eirene:

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arieldan1
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« Reply #21 on: June 17, 2006, 08:27:34 AM »

Eirene -- thank you so much for Latin lessons.  I took a year of Latin (about 20 years ago) before the teacher quit and the school cancelled the program.  I still would love to take a class and learn more -- enough to be able to read it.  I can manage "agricola in silvam est" (the farmer is in the woods -- I think), and conjugate the verb "to be", but that's about it.

My hat is off to you for having such extensive knowledge of the subject!!
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:ariel:
Eirene
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I'm sitting in a bowl of porridge, all night long.


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« Reply #22 on: June 20, 2006, 10:23:54 AM »

Eirene -- thank you so much for Latin lessons.  I took a year of Latin (about 20 years ago) before the teacher quit and the school cancelled the program.  I still would love to take a class and learn more -- enough to be able to read it.  I can manage "agricola in silvam est" (the farmer is in the woods -- I think), and conjugate the verb "to be", but that's about it.

My hat is off to you for having such extensive knowledge of the subject!!

Dear arieldan,

Fortunately, where I live, we still have quite good and resourceful means to learn Latin and ancient Greek. We have special highschools where Latin and Greek are mandatory. The educational programs are, sadly, not as rich as they used to be, but we still think that Latin and Greek classes can enrich our feeling for languages and culture. If you would like to learn Latin, though, there are means for this, even where you live and online. A means for online Latin learning is www.ancientworlds.net/aw/Group/32002 (Schola Lingua Latina). It's my online Latin School.

Maybe you would like to chek it out?

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene
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arieldan1
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« Reply #23 on: June 21, 2006, 05:50:44 PM »

Thanks!  I will certainly check the site out, although my time is somewhat scarce between caring for my 2 month old and working from home (and checking out RS.com!)!  But I will try!
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Eirene
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I'm sitting in a bowl of porridge, all night long.


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« Reply #24 on: June 25, 2006, 05:43:12 AM »

In the vacation period of the Episodes of ROME postings, I would like to propose, that anyone with any questions regarding the Latin lanuage, can post these here and I will answer them.

Any motto(s) or proverbs, sayings or anything else you would like to see translated into Latin, because you want to use them (on business cards, webpages, as signatures on community boards)? Post them here and I will translate a.s.a.p. Any saucy requests can be translated too, but please, send me a personal message or email (plup.plup@yahoo.com) and I will answer these through this medium!

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene
« Last Edit: November 16, 2007, 01:06:25 PM by Eirene » Logged


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arieldan1
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« Reply #25 on: June 27, 2006, 11:12:28 AM »

I'll take you up on your free tutoring offer, Eirene!

How about the good old standard -- "Hail Caesar, we who are about to die salute you"

I think it goes "Ave Caesarus, nos moritui te salutam" but I'm probably off....

And I remember my Latin teacher told us that there were theories that the "C" in "Caesar" was actually pronounced "K", and that's where the Kaisers of Germany and the Tsars of Russia got their titles from.  And also that the "v" was pronounced as a "w".  Did you run across these theories in your study of the language?
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Eirene
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« Reply #26 on: July 01, 2006, 02:06:41 AM »

Dear arieldan,


"Hail Caesar, those about to die salute you!" -------->"Ave Caesar, morituri te salutant"

Yes, the C was always pronounced as a "K". The V was pronounced as a very soft "V", not as a "W". That's different. The word "vinum" (wine) would still more begin with a sound that's like a "v" as we know it than a "w"-sound. The Germans brought that in. I think it's because of the way they got acquainted with Latin in ancient times. It seems that they brought the V= "w"-sound over to the US, but I'm not really sure about that.

Is that it? I was just beginning to enjoy myself.
Itane res se habet? Modo hoc delectari incipiebam


Right. Who's next?

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene
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:eirene:

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arieldan1
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« Reply #27 on: August 08, 2006, 08:06:05 PM »

Ummm, Eirene -- can I have another turn?  I've seen this on T-Shirts, but I don't know the Latin translation:

"If you can read this, you're overeducated"

Thanks!!!!
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:ariel:
Camamar
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« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2006, 09:16:11 PM »

Ummm, Eirene -- can I have another turn?  I've seen this on T-Shirts, but I don't know the Latin translation:

"If you can read this, you're overeducated"

Thanks!!!!

*cough...ahem..* If I may.....I actually have seen the exact Latin translation of this phrase (It was in an e-mail..Don't know if it is correct):


Si hoc legere scis nimium eruditionis habes.


I saw this one in the same place:

"If you can read this sign, you can get a good job in the fast-paced, high-paying world of Latin!"

Si hoc signum legere potes, operis boni in rebus Latinus alacribus et fructuosis potiri potes!
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A day without Ray is like a day without sunshine.....Worse, actually. A day without sunshine would save me having to put on sunscreen.
Eirene
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Gender: Female
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I'm sitting in a bowl of porridge, all night long.


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« Reply #29 on: August 30, 2006, 01:30:30 PM »

Heheh, obviously, there are more people on this blue marble translating into good Latin!  :lol:
That was all perfect!
I have started a teaching job again and in the classes I teach Latin in, I'm using Titus Pullo as a motivator. His line is:

Itane res se habet? Modo hoc delectari incipiebam.
Is that it? I was just beginning to enjoy myself.

One can use that as a motivator when things are fine and when things are bad at school, or wherever...LOL

pluppies,  :-*

Eirene
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