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Author Topic: New PWZ article? Post it HERE!  (Read 68846 times)
Nomad
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« on: October 13, 2008, 07:48:18 PM »

Woo hoo!  With 53 days and counting, the publicity is beginning.   It might be easiest and most fun if we can post all the articles to come on one thread, so we can keep track of them.  I'm SUCH a haus frau, keeping things neat and organised!   :girlpower:

Here's the first article from a BIG-TIME NEWS SOURCE on PWZ, from the web edition of the Los Angeles Times.  Woohoo!  Oh.  I already said that, neh?  It's getting so exciting!   :drule:

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/herocomplex/2008/10/the-punisher-re.html

:cheers:
:nomad:
« Last Edit: October 13, 2008, 07:54:27 PM by Nomad » Logged
Nomad
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« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2008, 08:28:19 PM »

'nuther article (Lexi Interview)

First of all, would you like to tell us how did you get in touch with this project and how did you get involved? How was your confidence with the character?

My agents sent me the script. Luckily, it was the original Nick Santora script not the newer revision, the one Thomas Jane passed on.
I read the Punisher comic books before I made the decision to do this, because that is the only way you can learn about an existing comic book character's essence. I fell in love with Frank Castle. He is a proper vigilante, without any weird PG rules he made for himself, like: "I'm only going to kill people who kill others or who are bad in this moment". No. Frank Castle knows only two sides: Good and Evil. There is no grey zone for him. If you are evil now, or have been in the past, or planning to be in the future, you are going to die. Period.  He is a great character. I loved telling his story.


It’s now clear that “Punisher: War Zone” has not the aim to compare itself with the 2004 movie. But is there something that the producers absolutely didn’t want to be made? And as a director, what is it like to work on a reboot instead of a “normal” movie?

On one occasion the folks at Marvel made me aware that something I was about to do was too close to the 2004 version. I think it was a specific line from the comic book I wanted to use. I'm glad they kept an eye on that, but essentially we had very little in common with the 2004 version from the get go.  The great thing about a reboot is, you can learn from the past if you care enough. I obviously watched the previous version, but I didn't critique it and just crossed my fingers that I can do it better. I spent weeks on the computer, reading reviews and fan reactions about it. It was pretty damn clear what the fans liked and didn't like about it. I basically had a road map for this reboot written by proper Punisher fans and the headline was: “Don’t go to Tampa!” [Tampa was the location for the 2004 "Punisher"].

Was the choice to base the film on the MAX comic series by Garth Ennis and on the aesthetics by Tim Brastreet yours? If so, what did inspire you in these sources?

I responded most to the MAX series and again, based on what I had read about, this was the Frank Castle whom people wanted to see on screen. We liked Tim's stuff, but he obviously works mostly covers and we wanted to make our film look like a MAX book. So my Director of Photography spoke to a few other artists who contributed to the actual series.

How does your competence in martial arts influence your work as a director? In particular, what influence did it have on a violent and aggressive movie as “Punisher: War Zone” seems to be ?

Because I grew up fighting,  I don't like losing on the mat or off the mat. In Hollywood there is always someone coming at you and unlike in a competition, they don't go by the "above the belt" and "never from the back" rules. It's quite fun actually, I just sometimes have to remember that.  As for how it affected “Punisher: War Zone”, I'm not sure it did.  There is a lot of brutal fighting, but it's rather ugly and less acrobatic. I guess the best advantage “Punisher: War Zone” had from my Martial Arts career was having two former World Champions, Pat Johnson and Jean Frenette in charge of the action and although I am sure they are always professional, I know they went more than the extra mile for me on “Punisher: War Zone” because I'm a fellow Martial Artist.

What about the levels of violence? Will there be only physical violence, or are we going to see also some psychological and social brutality, a pessimism and darkness of soul, like in the comic book?

The biggest blessing for our film was the actor portraying Frank Castle: Ray Stevenson. He is a real actor and you will experience this character with all his pain, the brutality of what happened in his past and certainly a soul that is struggling to see the light through his own darkness. Ray can portray all of that without ever saying a word and those are my favorite scenes to watch, even now after I've seen this film a few thousand times.  Furthermore, Jigsaw is not a simple antagonist. You think he has no empathy and no conscience but then he has this intense love for his brother which makes him a very complex character.

How do you see Frank Castle? While directing, what was your firm idea about what the Punisher should be? And how did Ray Stevenson respond to your expectations?

I wanted to stay true to the established Frank Castle mythology as much as possible, but I didn't have to tell Ray much. He read as many if not more comic books as I did and he truly channeled him.

And the rivals? As we know, in movies like this the rivals mean very much. How did they work in your film? How did you choose and then stage them?

As I mentioned before, Jigsaw is very three dimensional. Dominic West did a wonderful job portraying this out of the world character and unlike with Castle, we find a lot of humor in Jigsaw's and Looney Bin Jim's storyline, without ever losing touch of the danger they represent. Looney Bin Jim is portrayed by Doug Hutchinson who's career I've been following for a long time and whom I wanted to work with forever. It was fun to let both of these actors lose on set. They added so much to this film.

Obviously, speaking about a sequel is quite premature. But on a hypothetical level, do you have any idea in order to tell another Punisher story?

There is one specific Punisher book that I think should be adapted and I have a feeling the fans would totally dig it on screen.
I very much doubt there is a Punisher sequel in my future, but if the time ever comes I will share my two cents with Ray who I'm sure will be back for more.


Would you like to tell us something about your future projects or about what you would like to do?

Using a Martial Arts metaphor, when you have success as a competitive fighter, you should switch to a higher weight class or a different discipline because how else are you going to grow? I would like to try something else. As a matter of fact, I'd love to make a kid movie. If M. Night [Shyamalan] wouldn't already have the job, I'd probably sit outside Paramount Studio begging them to let me direct “Avatar: The Last Airbender”. I would have a sign that reads: "Will work for food."  Who knows what the future holds, but I'm excited to find out.


[by Valerio Coppola] [14-10-08]


http://www.comicus.it/view.php?section=interviste&id=223
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Labiaofthejulii
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Barmy Bawdy Besotted Brittunculi Bint


« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2008, 02:04:28 PM »

'nuther article (Lexi Interview)

First of all, would you like to tell us how did you get in touch with this project and how did you get involved? How was your confidence with the character?

My agents sent me the script. Luckily, it was the original Nick Santora script not the newer revision, the one Thomas Jane passed on.
I read the Punisher comic books before I made the decision to do this, because that is the only way you can learn about an existing comic book character's essence. I fell in love with Frank Castle. He is a proper vigilante, without any weird PG rules he made for himself, like: "I'm only going to kill people who kill others or who are bad in this moment". No. Frank Castle knows only two sides: Good and Evil. There is no grey zone for him. If you are evil now, or have been in the past, or planning to be in the future, you are going to die. Period.  He is a great character. I loved telling his story.


It’s now clear that “Punisher: War Zone” has not the aim to compare itself with the 2004 movie. But is there something that the producers absolutely didn’t want to be made? And as a director, what is it like to work on a reboot instead of a “normal” movie?

On one occasion the folks at Marvel made me aware that something I was about to do was too close to the 2004 version. I think it was a specific line from the comic book I wanted to use. I'm glad they kept an eye on that, but essentially we had very little in common with the 2004 version from the get go.  The great thing about a reboot is, you can learn from the past if you care enough. I obviously watched the previous version, but I didn't critique it and just crossed my fingers that I can do it better. I spent weeks on the computer, reading reviews and fan reactions about it. It was pretty damn clear what the fans liked and didn't like about it. I basically had a road map for this reboot written by proper Punisher fans and the headline was: “Don’t go to Tampa!” [Tampa was the location for the 2004 "Punisher"].

Was the choice to base the film on the MAX comic series by Garth Ennis and on the aesthetics by Tim Brastreet yours? If so, what did inspire you in these sources?

I responded most to the MAX series and again, based on what I had read about, this was the Frank Castle whom people wanted to see on screen. We liked Tim's stuff, but he obviously works mostly covers and we wanted to make our film look like a MAX book. So my Director of Photography spoke to a few other artists who contributed to the actual series.

How does your competence in martial arts influence your work as a director? In particular, what influence did it have on a violent and aggressive movie as “Punisher: War Zone” seems to be ?

Because I grew up fighting,  I don't like losing on the mat or off the mat. In Hollywood there is always someone coming at you and unlike in a competition, they don't go by the "above the belt" and "never from the back" rules. It's quite fun actually, I just sometimes have to remember that.  As for how it affected “Punisher: War Zone”, I'm not sure it did.  There is a lot of brutal fighting, but it's rather ugly and less acrobatic. I guess the best advantage “Punisher: War Zone” had from my Martial Arts career was having two former World Champions, Pat Johnson and Jean Frenette in charge of the action and although I am sure they are always professional, I know they went more than the extra mile for me on “Punisher: War Zone” because I'm a fellow Martial Artist.

What about the levels of violence? Will there be only physical violence, or are we going to see also some psychological and social brutality, a pessimism and darkness of soul, like in the comic book?

The biggest blessing for our film was the actor portraying Frank Castle: Ray Stevenson. He is a real actor and you will experience this character with all his pain, the brutality of what happened in his past and certainly a soul that is struggling to see the light through his own darkness. Ray can portray all of that without ever saying a word and those are my favorite scenes to watch, even now after I've seen this film a few thousand times.  Furthermore, Jigsaw is not a simple antagonist. You think he has no empathy and no conscience but then he has this intense love for his brother which makes him a very complex character.

How do you see Frank Castle? While directing, what was your firm idea about what the Punisher should be? And how did Ray Stevenson respond to your expectations?

I wanted to stay true to the established Frank Castle mythology as much as possible, but I didn't have to tell Ray much. He read as many if not more comic books as I did and he truly channeled him.

And the rivals? As we know, in movies like this the rivals mean very much. How did they work in your film? How did you choose and then stage them?

As I mentioned before, Jigsaw is very three dimensional. Dominic West did a wonderful job portraying this out of the world character and unlike with Castle, we find a lot of humor in Jigsaw's and Looney Bin Jim's storyline, without ever losing touch of the danger they represent. Looney Bin Jim is portrayed by Doug Hutchinson who's career I've been following for a long time and whom I wanted to work with forever. It was fun to let both of these actors lose on set. They added so much to this film.

Obviously, speaking about a sequel is quite premature. But on a hypothetical level, do you have any idea in order to tell another Punisher story?

There is one specific Punisher book that I think should be adapted and I have a feeling the fans would totally dig it on screen.
I very much doubt there is a Punisher sequel in my future, but if the time ever comes I will share my two cents with Ray who I'm sure will be back for more.


Would you like to tell us something about your future projects or about what you would like to do?

Using a Martial Arts metaphor, when you have success as a competitive fighter, you should switch to a higher weight class or a different discipline because how else are you going to grow? I would like to try something else. As a matter of fact, I'd love to make a kid movie. If M. Night [Shyamalan] wouldn't already have the job, I'd probably sit outside Paramount Studio begging them to let me direct “Avatar: The Last Airbender”. I would have a sign that reads: "Will work for food."  Who knows what the future holds, but I'm excited to find out.


[by Valerio Coppola] [14-10-08]


http://www.comicus.it/view.php?section=interviste&id=223

Thanks, Nomad!

I really enjoyed reading this and got little excited pangs in deep places from reading about Ray  :clap:
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Aut Viam
Inveniam
Aut Faciam

And all because the lady loves... Ray

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Nomad
Guest
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2008, 07:26:43 PM »

New Lexi blog and her interview with her fave Devil Dog!

DEVIL DOGS 10/23/08

Someone asked me the other day if Frank Castle has a Military history in PWZ. I can’t even believe I haven’t made that clear in any of my blogs or interviews.

Hell yeah he has a f!@#ing Military history!

I have been fond of the Marine Corps for a very long time, way before I ever laid eyes on my first Punisher book. As a matter of fact, one of my first jobs in the US was teaching a Martial Arts seminar at Camp Pendleton. So when I read Castle’s bio and found out that he was a Marine Captain and Force Recon bad ass, I was already sold.

My own Marine buddies keep bitching at me about the inaccuracy of anything to do with Military in Hollywood movies, so I made sure that wasn’t going to happen on PWZ.
I already spoke about GUNMETAL on my blog, the company who was in charge of training Ray and consulting us during production, but I’d like to introduce them over the next few weeks more in detail and one by one. After all, the US Military is were we find our true nonfiction heroes.

I’d like to start with real-life bad ass number one...(m)y buddy Sergeant Jonathan Barton or “JB.”

JB was our man on set and trust me when I tell you, there was no shooting going on unless JB was around. I could tell you all the great things he choreographed for us and all the great weapons he suggested we use during production, but JB has an unprecedented knowledge of that stuff and kind of his own language. I usually lose him at “hello”. I thought I’ll ask him a few questions he can answer here, so all you gun experts and fellow Military folk can actually get some real inside.

Click here to read the interview.

http://lexialexander.com/JBarton.html

Peace out
Lexi


Have fun with this one!
:nomad:
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wingit4me
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« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2008, 03:33:55 PM »

YAY So happy Lexi is sharing with us on her blog again.
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:wingit:
Nomad
Guest
« Reply #5 on: November 03, 2008, 11:20:48 AM »

Here's another JBarton interview:

http://www.comicus.it/view.php?section=rubriche&id=1258

Could you tell us something about your career and how did you get to collaborating with movies productions like this one?

Your work on this film seems to be wide, from training to military consulting service. What was the level of this collaboration? Did you work behind the scenes or were you an active part on the set?

Was your advice requested since the beginning of the definitive version of the script or did you get onboard later to give a proper shape to the action?

We can imagine that the character you worked on most was Frank Castle: his military skills required a realistic performance in the film. What was your job on The Punisher? How did you try to portray him, according to your scopes?

Basically, my job was Military Advisor and Combat trainer. After my first week I realized that I had to get my fingers into the other departments on the show and take more of an assertive role in making sure the Punisher character fit Lexi’s vision. This meant stepping on some toes from time to time and taking control of certain elements in other departments, but Lexi had told me what she wanted and by damn, it was gonna get done!
After the first week I was designing costumes, designing weapons, inventing props, training not only Ray but his stunt double and all the other actors and stuntmen, and writing and rehearsing weapon choreography! I felt like I was back in the Corps!


Did you offer your services even to characterize the villains? If yes, how did you differentiate them by the Punisher or police forces, talking about tactics?

For this particular project none of the main bad guys had military or Law enforcement back-story so I just worked on weapons safety and helped them work different types of guns into their characters. For each actor on their first day of weapons training, I had them go to a table filled with rifles, handguns, grenade launchers, and shotguns, and told them to pick one. Every actor picked different sets of weapons that complemented their back story. We then worked on how each of them, in character, would try to shoot the Punisher if he were coming after them. So basically we invented different shooting styles!

What kind of weapons have been used? Conventional or even unconventional, as sometimes seen in the comic book?

We used weapons based on need and back-story and nothing made up. All of the Punisher’s weapons currently exist and are being used in modern combat! The Punisher originated out of Vietnam, so his primary weapon in the film is an M-4 which he would feel the most comfortable with. To that I mounted a mini grenade launcher using thermo baric grenades for point detonations. I followed that up with the most powerful revolver on the planet, a Knight’s Armament/Smith&Wesson custom Model 500 .50 cal, in a breakaway leg holster as his back-up!

We created two fully automatic Beretta 92f handguns for close quarter combat.
In the opening of the film he uses ultra reliable H&K custom MP5’s in fully automatic that he carries in the small of his back, and for speed draws a H&K USP compact .45.
I also had a custom mini 13” Bolo machete combat knife created that he carries on a leg holster for hand to hand.

The result was modern weapons used in the modern time, but in full Punisher style!


Has ever occurred that you had to note that some element originally planned was unrealistic or not believable? From your point of view, what is the realism level of this movie?

This is by far the most realist Punisher ever made. Every scene, every plot point, every scenario was discussed and brought to real world scenarios. Having said that, we were still making a comic book adaptation, and Lexi was able to have freedom to make some of the action larger than life because that’s how the comic was written. As a Marine I am extremely excited about how well this movie portrays this character. I think audiences will really connect to this Punisher like never before!

Did you enjoy working on such an extreme fighter as Castle? How does this kind of character seem to a serviceman?

The Punisher will always be a symbol to the Marine Corps infantryman, as well as other branches of service, of the ultimate warrior. A guy that takes the fight to the enemy’s doorstep, then kicks his door in. As a Marine being on the front lines you have to feel no fear and have the courage to fight even when you are scared out of your mind in order to bring yourself and your buddies home. I think the Punisher embodies the true fighting spirit of what all combat troops feel when the enter a room full of people that want to do them harm. It’s important that symbols like Punisher exist for us in the military and he will always have a home with the US Marines! “Semper fi” Frank!

:nomad:

« Last Edit: November 03, 2008, 11:14:10 PM by Nomad » Logged
Camamar
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Gender: Female
Posts: 1780



« Reply #6 on: November 03, 2008, 03:10:12 PM »

Hewre's another JBarton interview:

http://www.comicus.it/view.php?section=rubriche&id=1258

Could you tell us something about your career and how did you get to collaborating with movies productions like this one?

Your work on this film seems to be wide, from training to military consulting service. What was the level of this collaboration? Did you work behind the scenes or were you an active part on the set?

Was your advice requested since the beginning of the definitive version of the script or did you get onboard later to give a proper shape to the action?

We can imagine that the character you worked on most was Frank Castle: his military skills required a realistic performance in the film. What was your job on The Punisher? How did you try to portray him, according to your scopes?

Basically, my job was Military Advisor and Combat trainer. After my first week I realized that I had to get my fingers into the other departments on the show and take more of an assertive role in making sure the Punisher character fit Lexi’s vision. This meant stepping on some toes from time to time and taking control of certain elements in other departments, but Lexi had told me what she wanted and by damn, it was gonna get done!
After the first week I was designing costumes, designing weapons, inventing props, training not only Ray but his stunt double and all the other actors and stuntmen, and writing and rehearsing weapon choreography! I felt like I was back in the Corps!


Did you offer your services even to characterize the villains? If yes, how did you differentiate them by the Punisher or police forces, talking about tactics?

For this particular project none of the main bad guys had military or Law enforcement back-story so I just worked on weapons safety and helped them work different types of guns into their characters. For each actor on their first day of weapons training, I had them go to a table filled with rifles, handguns, grenade launchers, and shotguns, and told them to pick one. Every actor picked different sets of weapons that complemented their back story. We then worked on how each of them, in character, would try to shoot the Punisher if he were coming after them. So basically we invented different shooting styles!

What kind of weapons have been used? Conventional or even unconventional, as sometimes seen in the comic book?

We used weapons based on need and back-story and nothing made up. All of the Punisher’s weapons currently exist and are being used in modern combat! The Punisher originated out of Vietnam, so his primary weapon in the film is an M-4 which he would feel the most comfortable with. To that I mounted a mini grenade launcher using thermo baric grenades for point detonations. I followed that up with the most powerful revolver on the planet, a Knight’s Armament/Smith&Wesson custom Model 500 .50 cal, in a breakaway leg holster as his back-up!

We created two fully automatic Beretta 92f handguns for close quarter combat.
In the opening of the film he uses ultra reliable H&K custom MP5’s in fully automatic that he carries in the small of his back, and for speed draws a H&K USP compact .45.
I also had a custom mini 13” Bolo machete combat knife created that he carries on a leg holster for hand to hand.

The result was modern weapons used in the modern time, but in full Punisher style!


Has ever occurred that you had to note that some element originally planned was unrealistic or not believable? From your point of view, what is the realism level of this movie?

This is by far the most realist Punisher ever made. Every scene, every plot point, every scenario was discussed and brought to real world scenarios. Having said that, we were still making a comic book adaptation, and Lexi was able to have freedom to make some of the action larger than life because that’s how the comic was written. As a Marine I am extremely excited about how well this movie portrays this character. I think audiences will really connect to this Punisher like never before!

Did you enjoy working on such an extreme fighter as Castle? How does this kind of character seem to a serviceman?

The Punisher will always be a symbol to the Marine Corps infantryman, as well as other branches of service, of the ultimate warrior. A guy that takes the fight to the enemy’s doorstep, then kicks his door in. As a Marine being on the front lines you have to feel no fear and have the courage to fight even when you are scared out of your mind in order to bring yourself and your buddies home. I think the Punisher embodies the true fighting spirit of what all combat troops feel when the enter a room full of people that want to do them harm. It’s important that symbols like Punisher exist for us in the military and he will always have a home with the US Marines! “Semper fi” Frank!

:nomad:



Thanks, Nomad.

woohooo! 32 days until punishment is handed out!

I finally made my way through both parts of the film 'Grindhouse'. Seeing or reading about that kind of violence & gore makes my guts hurt a bit....but I do confess I cheered the grrrrrls on when they would hand out punishment. :lexi: :guns2: :flex: :guns3: :karate: :lexi2

:bead:
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A day without Ray is like a day without sunshine.....Worse, actually. A day without sunshine would save me having to put on sunscreen.
Nomad
Guest
« Reply #7 on: November 06, 2008, 04:16:43 PM »

Mania Exclusive: PUNISHER WAR ZONE TV Spot
By: Rob M. Worley
Date: Thursday, November 06, 2008

Lionsgate has provided Mania readers with an exclusive first look at the new TV ad for 'Punisher War Zone'.

Watch closely for a couple of good frames of Dominc West's Jigsaw. One other point of interest we noticed is the use of the "Marvel Knights" brand name in place of the traditional Marvel flip-comic graphic that fans have seen before all Marvel films since 'Spider-Man'.


http://www.mania.com/mania-exclusive-punisher-war-zone-tv-spot_article_110984.html

:cheers:
:nomad:
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mob1
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All for one, and one for all!!


« Reply #8 on: November 06, 2008, 11:29:36 PM »

oh la la, Nomad, me likey that ad...*gets shivers down my body*  :silly:  :devilish:

« Last Edit: November 06, 2008, 11:32:11 PM by mob1 » Logged

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Camamar
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« Reply #9 on: November 07, 2008, 06:09:06 AM »

Mania Exclusive: PUNISHER WAR ZONE TV Spot
By: Rob M. Worley
Date: Thursday, November 06, 2008

Lionsgate has provided Mania readers with an exclusive first look at the new TV ad for 'Punisher War Zone'.

Watch closely for a couple of good frames of Dominc West's Jigsaw. One other point of interest we noticed is the use of the "Marvel Knights" brand name in place of the traditional Marvel flip-comic graphic that fans have seen before all Marvel films since 'Spider-Man'.


http://www.mania.com/mania-exclusive-punisher-war-zone-tv-spot_article_110984.html

:cheers:
:nomad:


Thanks!!! At least I got to see a little more of Ray there..or more illuminated shots, or closer-up shots...or whatever. *blathering*
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A day without Ray is like a day without sunshine.....Worse, actually. A day without sunshine would save me having to put on sunscreen.
Nomad
Guest
« Reply #10 on: November 07, 2008, 11:06:45 AM »

This is a relief to read there will be an actual score for PWZ.  I like heavy metal in SMALL doses so it's a relief to know the entire film won't be screaming at me.  This score should have some Blade Runner elements to it.  It sounds like that may be the case.

November 7, 2008
MICHAEL WANDMACHER SCORES 'PUNISHER: WAR ZONE'
(Hollywood, CA) – Composer Michael Wandmacher brings a new note to the battle between good and evil with his score for Punisher: War Zone, based on the Marvel comic book character. Along with Wandmacher, Academy Award nominated director Lexi Alexander (“Johnny Flynton”) and writers Nick Santora (“Prison Break,” “Law & Order”), Art Marcum (“Iron Man”) and Matt Holloway (“Iron Man”) round out the impressive team. Lionsgate Films releases Punisher: War Zone in theaters on December 5, 2008.

For Punisher: War Zone, Michael Wandmacher’s score both reflects the ominous tone of the film and skillfully brings a necessary lightness to the heavy plot. Percussion beats, reminiscent of war drums, echo throughout, as the characters struggle against each other. At other moments, Wandmacher relies on string and woodwind instruments, resulting in a melancholy sound. Although the score is mostly symphonic, Wandmacher does include some of his signature electronic sounds, all along creating seamless transitions between the varying elements.

Michael Wandmacher began his musical career as a commercial composer in Minneapolis. Since his move to Los Angeles in 1998, Wandmacher has lent his talent to a diverse range of projects, including feature films, TV series and videogames. His film credits include Never Back Down, The Killing Floor and Cry Wolf. In addition, he scored the videogames Over the Hedge and Madagascar. Wandmacher also records, produces and remixes electronic music under the name Khursor and wrote and mixed music for Kelly Clarkson for the film From Justin to Kelly. In January, his score to My Bloody Valentine 3-D hits theaters.


http://scoretracknet.blogspot.com/2008/11/michael-wandmacher-scores-punisher-war.html

Nomad

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wingit4me
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« Reply #11 on: November 09, 2008, 03:43:57 PM »

http://www.comicbookmovie.com/punisher/punisher_war_zone/news/?a=5183

Ok Nomad go buy a copy of this when it comes out on Nov. 12 and report back.
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:wingit:
Nomad
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« Reply #12 on: November 09, 2008, 05:37:34 PM »

http://www.comicbookmovie.com/punisher/punisher_war_zone/news/?a=5183

Ok Nomad go buy a copy of this when it comes out on Nov. 12 and report back.

Ummm...I pre-ordered it day before yesterday. *blush*

:nomad:
« Last Edit: November 09, 2008, 06:42:43 PM by Nomad » Logged
wingit4me
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« Reply #13 on: November 09, 2008, 07:05:30 PM »

 :cheer: :cheer: YAY Nomad.  Knew we could count on you  :cheer2: :cheer2:
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:wingit:
Nomad
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« Reply #14 on: November 12, 2008, 07:34:19 PM »

The Global Punisher Army has made a new video with a message from Lexi Alexander.  Here it is:

http://www.globalpunisherarmy.com/gpaboards/index.php?topic=2645.0

You guys/gals know the GPA recently banned me for a week, neh?  It was for posting a sexually explicit picture.  It certainly was NOT.  It was a centaur...a female centaur that I wanted to use as my avatar. 

Were you all aware that females of all sorts have breasts?  Apparently the boys at the GPA were not and they found it shocking.   :dance:

:cheers:
:nomad:
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