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wingit4me
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« Reply #30 on: October 08, 2010, 03:30:59 PM »

http://www.collider.com/2010/10/07/luke-evans-interview-tamara-drewe-immortals-three-musketeers/

Luke Evans Interview:

" ... What has the experience of The Three Musketeers been like, and how is this version of the story different from previous versions?

Luke: Well, it’s essentially the same story. It is The Three Musketeers, and it’s a fantastic story, which is why it deserves to be adapted again. Paul W.S. Anderson has an amazing ability to use the PACE 3D technology from Avatar, which he’s worked with on other films, like Resident Evil: Afterlife. He’s using all he’s learned and he’s putting it into what you wouldn’t necessarily expect 3D to be used on. And, we’re shooting on locations that have never been put on film before. They discovered these palaces and castles, and these royal residences that are so ornate and ancient, all over Bavaria, and we’ve shot on all of them. It’s breathtaking. You walk onto these locations and they’re in the middle of nowhere.


We’re living in tiny little bed & breakfasts and traveling around like a big circus. You couldn’t wish to have a backdrop that is so authentic. Even though it’s not Paris, the age and the look of all these places, to the naked eye, are breathtaking. And when you see them in 3D, because with PACE it’s immediately in 3D and you can put your glasses on in the playback tent where we have big flat screen TVs, you get to see the detail of these places. These places are real. They’re hundreds of years old, and we’re working on them and bringing them to life with this incredible cast. We’re just having a brilliant time. They’ve cast us and we really have become our roles. It’s very funny. We’ve all become very similar to who we are in the film. It’s very interesting. We’re having a really good time. I’m looking forward to getting back there because it’s weird leaving it and being in a t-shirt in sunny L.A., when I should actually be swashbuckling it up in Bavaria.

As an actor, what is it like to shoot in 3D? Does it change your process at all?

Luke: No, not at all. I’m completely unaware of it, to be honest. The cameras are twice the size. There are two cameras, so they’re much bigger, but it doesn’t matter, as an actor in a scene. You just do the scene and they’ll do their thing. It’s much more of a technical difference, really. But, what is nice is to be able to see it in 3D, especially because we’re doing so much stunt work and a lot of fighting. I’m doing a lot of my own stuff. I’m doing most of my own fighting with the swords and you realize that in 3D you can’t fake it. You can’t swipe a sword three feet away from somebody’s face. It has to be inches from their face because in 3D you can see it. So, we’ve had to really master the art of this fencing technique, which is an art form. It’s been a real challenge, but I love it. I’ve really, thoroughly enjoyed it. And my opinion on 3D, working on Immortals and working on The Three Musketeers, has really jumped to a new level of respect because it really has earned its place. This form of 3D has very much earned its place in cinema today.

How much preparation and rehearsals have you done for all the fight scenes you’ve been doing?

Luke: I left Newcastle to do an independent called Flutter, flew to Montreal and did physical training for seven weeks for Immortals, and lost 30 pounds of my body weight. I lost five inches off my waist and literally changed my physique because we were not in very many clothes. We played the Gods, so Tarsem wanted us to have our perfect physical, peak look. That was a challenge in that film because we had these big fight sequences, and we fought Titans and all these monsters, so there was a lot to be done.


On The Three Musketeers, it’s the same thing. We had three weeks training for the sword fighting, with a European gold medalist fencer who taught us the technique. It was serious stuff. And then, we had Nick Powell, this incredible stunt coordinator, who has managed to make each fighting style for each of the three Musketeers to look absolutely unique to who they are, as their character. I am very catlike and very agile in my fighting, and Porthos (Ray Stevenson) is very brash and very bull-in-a-china-shop, and Athos (Matthew Macfadyen) is very masterful and graceful. I’m going back and having to learn my next flight. We shot a fight, which took nearly two weeks to shoot, right from the beginning of the film. It’s quite nice to start with a really big, dramatic fight, but we were glad when it was done because it was huge. It was fantastic, but we’re on to the next one now because we’re only half-way through shooting. There’s so much to be done....."
« Last Edit: October 08, 2010, 03:34:28 PM by wingit4me » Logged

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britmys
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« Reply #31 on: October 08, 2010, 04:57:28 PM »

Thnaks, wing!  I can't always get the links to work so I appreciate the interview.

:brit:
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Ariantes
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« Reply #32 on: September 15, 2011, 11:20:10 PM »

Interview with Ray
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britmys
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« Reply #33 on: September 17, 2011, 01:15:48 PM »

Thank you, Ariantes!  Did he at one point say, ...hot?"  I would say that he certainly is!  Can hardly wait for the American debut.

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"There are girls from Narbo to Thebes who cry my name at night"   Titus Pullo

Ooh, and I'm one of them :crush:
Labiaofthejulii
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« Reply #34 on: September 18, 2011, 01:58:15 PM »

I enjoyed that. And I must say: what a magnificent beard!  :ray:
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Labiaofthejulii
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« Reply #35 on: September 22, 2011, 04:54:42 AM »

I enjoyed that. And I must say: what a magnificent beard!  :ray:

*Munches lunchtime sandwich*

Beard eh...? Tis truly magnificent. I have high hopes of Ray's beard acting its socks off in the Three Musketeers (and a £1 bet that Porthos says "Odds Boddikins" at least once)  ;D

Hmm. Methinks I'm obsessed with facial hair  :think:

Last weekend, daughter and I had a DVD Twilight-fest of New Moon and Eclipse. Couldn't tear my eyes away from the hauntingly beautiful face of Robert Pattinson again. More specifically, his superb eyebrows. His lashes ain't bad either.

And despite a decidedly eyepopping ogle last Saturday at the rather wonderful Adam Levine's nekkid piccie for Cosmo earlier this year; twas his eyebrows not his body nor his tattoes wot caught my eye.

Is there something wrong with me?
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« Reply #36 on: September 23, 2011, 11:14:33 PM »

Quote
Is there something wrong with me?

Yes and you gave it to me, Labia..not a Pattinson fan but I was mooning over a very young Aaron Johnson who plays a teenage John Lennon in "Nowhere Boy" ...oof what a doll and he likes older women in real life..The producer is his gf and he is the tender age of 20 and she is 44...I guess there is hope for older women everywhere.
Good movie Btw.
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wingit4me
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« Reply #37 on: September 25, 2011, 09:16:54 PM »

http://goodfilmguide.co.uk/kill-the-irishman-interview-with-lead-actor-ray-stevenson/

Kill The Irishman: Interview with Lead Actor Ray Stevenson
 by Matt Wheeldon
Sep 23 2011
Anyone who lived in Cleveland during the 1970s will know the name, and the legend, of Danny Greene; an Irish-American mob enforcer who attempted to single-handedly shoot his way to the top of the criminal underworld during that time, yet was unanimously loved by the people of the community; he was dubbed “the Robin Hood of Collinwood”, and is the subject of the soon to be released biopic Kill the Irishman.

Showing how Greene earned his status as “the man the mob couldn’t kill” by instigating “the war that crippled the mafia”, and surviving numerous assassination attempts, the Jonathan Hensleigh (Armageddon) written and directed picture features an all star cast that includes the likes of Ray Stevenson (Rome), Christopher Walken (Catch Me If You Can), Vincent D’Onofrio (Full Metal Jacket), and Val Kilmer (Heat), and in order to celebrate its upcoming release on Blu-ray and DVD we caught up with lead actor Ray Stevenson (who plays Greene in the movie) to talk about Danny, the dangers of filming in Detroit, and everything from The Three Musketeers to explosions, G.I. Joe, job offers, and the weather.

What first drew you to Kill The Irishman?

Ray: I was filming The Book of Eli and got a phonecall from Jonathan Hensleigh; the director and writer of it; and we arranged a meeting for when I got back to Los Angeles, and part of it was just his enthusiasm for the story; I wasn’t even aware of it, but when I started reading the script it felt kind of  familiar, and I was thinking… “I’ve heard this story. How do I? I know it.” Sure enough I then remembered seeing a thing called ‘American Mobsters’ on television, and it was the story of Danny Greene, and I remembered bits of it from the live footage that we ended up using in the film. Obviously Jonathan’s script was the biggest draw ever, and it scared me; it was like “Can I really pull this off?”; so i jumped at the chance to do it.

The script must have been a big draw, because it’s drawn such an impressive cast… what was it like working with Chistopher Walken, Val Kilmer, and everyone else?

Ray: Amazing! The thing is that Val Kilmer, Chris Walken, Vincent D’Onofrio, Steve Schrippa [The Sopranos]; the list goes on; they are all striking leading men in their own right, and they have an incredible presence; which I think is quite wonderful, because it was like the Wild West then, the mobsters of the time, the gangsters of the day, and even the police officers, they were larger than life, they were the genuine article walking down the street right in plain view – you would see the heads of the families, the people who really were names – and casting guys like this to play these roles was inspired. It was certainly interesting on set, and it was nice that there were no shrinking wall flowers or anything, everthing and everybody was present.


Ray Stevenson stars in Anchor Bay Films’ Kill the Irishman.
What do you think of portraying someone like Danny Greene as a kind of hero, and a Robin Hood type character?

Ray: I like to think that we didn’t go out to do that, but he was like that already; in his own lifetime he was called “The Robin Hood of Collinwood”; but we didn’t glamorise him or redeem him at all. He’s a violent man, a criminal, an enforcer, but whats fascinating is that its not a movie about gangsters and mobsters, but it’s just about a guy who was on his own personal journey; almost like a rights of passage, a grown-up’s rights of passage (what we’re all looking for a sense of identity or whatever), and his journey just happens to be couched in this very violent world; and it’s also been so well received by female audiences, which, for such a male-centric movie, I think the greatest testimony to the film is that female viewers have gone to see it, and got it, and enjoyed the movie.

Did you research the part much?

Ray: There was quite a bit of research material available;  there are quite a few ‘records‘ we can look at *laughs*, and obviously all the footage, the live TV footage, newsreels, and all that sort of stuff, there’s the book To Kill The Irishman, and all the character’s that are still alive, but eventually you get to a point where you have to stop that; because you’re not making a documentary, you’re making a movie, and telling this tale, in the end you have to put all that stuff down and just make the story.

So you have to put a lot of yourself into the role as well then?

Ray: Well that’s inevitable, because you’re not trying to do a Madame Tussauds representation of it, but you’re telling more of the emotional content of the story, and showing this man’s journey of self-discovery through a very violent world.

Did you find it easy to relate to Danny Greene then?

Ray: I don’t know. Time will tell!

 

“One of our trucks ended up with seven bullet holes in it while we were filming… Detroit is a dangerous place… you’ve just got to roll with it.”
- Ray Stevenson

 

There are a lot of explosions in film. Were there any mishaps or anything on set?

Ray: No. It was a low budget movie, shot for under $10 million, so we only had one go at these things and everybody had to be on point; I mean hopefully whenever there are pyrotechnics around everybody’s on point anyway, but if there were any mishaps we couldn’t reset and go again. The amount of preperation and concerntration just making sure that everything was prepared as much as possible and checked, and rechecked, and ready to roll, then the countdown came, they set the camera and go, and everyone had to be extremely focussed as well, because we didn’t have time either; we shot the whole movie in 7 weeks, and I think it looks like a $30 million movie and we shot it for less than $10 million, which is a testament to everbody involved.

Watching the film it looks like you were filming in some pretty rough areas. Was there ever any trouble on set?

Ray: Well yeh, Detroit is very much like the Wild West at the minute; General Motors have gone bankrupt, and there’s such a lot of poverty; downtown and central Detroit was once such a thriving hub, but it’s now just full of burnt of shells and husks of buildings, and you can see some amazing big properties which would have belonged to the industry tycoons, but they’re just sitting there empty while there are slum neighbourhoods right next to it with rundown properties and not a lot of regeneration going on. When you think that this is the home of Mowtown music and the car industry, well, the bastards just stole everything, they stole everything from everybody, and then asked for their $30 billion payout and got it, and then asked for another one and got it! but none of it ever appeared on the streets of Detroit.

There was one horrible incident, a guy was shot in the neck outside some supermarket at night; we were driving to and from the set, and it was one of the drivers who was ferrying people across who said it was seriously about 30-to-45 minutes before the ambulance arrived, and the guys just sat there with their lights on, waiting another 35-40 minutes for the cops to get there, because the ambulance crew won’t go in without a police escort; it’s a known gang area, and if it’s a gang member they’re trying to resussitate then there’s a good chance a rival gang will start taking pot-shots at the ambulance crews.


Ray Stevenson stars in Anchor Bay Films’ Kill the Irishman.
It was a pretty dangerous area then?

Ray: Yeh, kinda. You had all that sort of shit going on, and one of our crew trucks ended up with seven bullet holes in it one night; I’m not sure what it was about, some kind of altercation; so you had to keep your wits about you, but at the same time I must say the people of the Detroit – and I can’t stress this strongly enough – they could not have been nicer; they know how much it meant to have a film made in Michigan, and they couldnt have been more accomodating. The trouble all came from a very small fraction of desperate people and trouble makers. You’ve just got to roll with it, it’s like the Wild West out there now, but I just hope they get back on their feet, because that’s a city with a great history.

The majority of the people obviously appreciated you being there then?

Ray: Oh completely. They are living with it day to day, everyday, and really appreciate what it means for the community to have movies made there.

And now, after having the crew’s trucks shot at, and making a movie where people are constantly trying to blow you up, you’re moving on  to play an explosives expert in G.I. Joe 2?

Ray: Yeh. Firefly!

And how’s that going?

Ray: It’s great. I haven’t blown anything up yet, but when I do… *laughs*! We’re here in New Orleans, I’m looking out of the window now, and we’ve just had a huge marsh fire, and I don’t know how many miles it is but the place has been blanketed in this fine mist of smoke, and it’s now 96 degrees outside.

Warm enough for you then?

Ray: Oh yeh. and just in time for hurricane season!

 

“I like the warrior aspect to some of the characters I’ve played… nobody wakes up in the morning and thinks ‘I’m going to be a bad guy‘… but Danny did take somebody’s head off with a golf club.”
- Ray Stevenson

 

Getting back to The Irishman…

Ray: Before you ask… there’s not going to be a sequel! *laughs*

Danny is kind of loveable rogue type character; he does bad things but you can often see why…

Ray: Well yeh exactly, I mean nobody wakes up in the morning and thinks “right, I’m going to be a bad guy”, but then he did take somebody’ head off with a golf club, and there’s the whole indiscriminate nature of the collaterol damage whenever you blow stuff to shit; bombs are a pretty indiscriminate weapon of choice.

Are you drawn to characters like that, and do they reflect you at all?

Ray: I like the warrior aspect, such as when I played Pullo [in HBO’s Rome], they’re people you wouldn’t want to be against, but there is something within everybody’s nature like that, and I think they’re often just much more interesting, fuller drawn, characters. So far I’ve played quite a few of them, but I wasn’t a warrior in my latest film; Jayne Masnfield’s Car; which I’ve just shot with Billy Bob Thornton [Armageddon].

And who do you play in that movie?

Ray: I play this guy called Carroll Caldwell, and John Hurt [Alien] is my father! Robert Duvall [The Godfather] is in it, Kevin Bacon [Footloose], Robert Patrick [Terminator 2], Billy Bob Thornton of Course, and it’s called Jayne Mansfield’s Car; it’s a wonderful story about these two families who are on an inevitable course of hurtling into one another, an English family and an American family, and it’s set in 1969 so it was nice to do another kind of period film.


Ray Stevenson stars in Anchor Bay Films’ Kill the Irishman.
You’ve got quite a busy slate then, because The Three Musketeers is coming out soon as well…

Ray: Three Musketeers is out in October. I’ll be in London for the premiere, and that was great fun.

It was one you enjoyed making?

Ray: Oh God yes! I got to be Porthos! Another slightly violent person, but it was a great laugh, and Paul Anderson [Resident Evil] is just a genius to work for, there were great actors all around me, and it was all shot using the Avatar system; so it was all in 3D; and the big difference there is that the camera sees around you, so all the sword movements had to be on point; they had to be bang on target; adding that extra necessity of discipline.

Was that difficult?

Ray: Yeh. Well, the training was, but it’s a requirement, and when you’re shooting in 3D and you’ve got all those swrods around you, you’ve got to be on point; but it’s all fight training and as long as you concerntrate and focus it’ll be alright; because sometimes you’ve got about 40 blades smashing through the air, so you just make sure you’re in you’re right spot, and hope that everybody else is in theirs.

 

“Kill The Irishman… go and see it!”
- Ray Stevenson

 

Going back to Kill the Irishman again, did you find it difficult to get the part of Danny Greene, being a British actor? Were they looking for American actors first?

Ray: It was so easy! I’ll tell you why, seriously, the director had me in mind; I didn’t audition for it, I wasn’t even aware it was going to be cast; I was his choice, so he made the call to me, then arranged to come and meet me, showed me the script, talked through the story, and then it was simply a case of saying “You’re kidding? Of course I want to do it!”

That’s got be handy for an actor?

Ray: Yeh, it’s lucky that that’s the way it is sometimes, when writers and directors will have people in mind; sometimes suitable, sometimes not available, but as an actor it’s great; it’s like the easiest job you can get, but then you’ve still got to step up and do it.
It happened that way with Thor as well, Ken Branagh called me up and offered me Thor, and on G.I. Joe the producer phoned my agent in California and offered me that, so it’s nice when that happens; it means you don’t have to think too much, and that’s always good for an actor, it’s best not to make them think!

Finally… if you could sum up why people should go and see Kill The Irishman, what would you say?

Ray: I’d say…. go and see it, because it’s an old-school mobster movie, with a man’s journey, that’s couched in violence.
I don’t know actually because it’s a great movie, but it’s probably best left up to you to decide… so you watch it, and I’m sure you’ll work it out!



Kill The Irishman, the true story of mobster Danny Greene; a violent criminal who caused nearly 40 bombs to explode in Cleveland during the 1970s, started a war with the mafia, and was so loved by the local community they dubbed him “The Robin Hood of Collinwood”; is due to be released on Blu-ray and DVD on September 26th, and is available to pre-order directly from the links below.

Matt Wheeldon.
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Labiaofthejulii
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« Reply #38 on: September 27, 2011, 10:16:27 AM »

Some good interviews lately. Thanks to all the eagle-eyed RayVers!   :clap:
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mob1
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« Reply #39 on: September 30, 2011, 08:00:39 PM »

That interview is about Kill the Irishman and it is posted in The Three Muskateers interviews. You might want to move it to the Kill the Irishman thread, Wing. Just a suggestion.
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wingit4me
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« Reply #40 on: October 01, 2011, 08:24:26 PM »

That interview is about Kill the Irishman and it is posted in The Three Muskateers interviews. You might want to move it to the Kill the Irishman thread, Wing. Just a suggestion.
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Ariantes
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« Reply #41 on: October 03, 2011, 08:55:16 AM »

Youtube Interviews
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Ariantes
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« Reply #42 on: October 04, 2011, 09:12:11 AM »

--> BBC Breakfast Show

starts at 18min15sec
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Labiaofthejulii
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« Reply #43 on: October 04, 2011, 02:49:13 PM »

--> BBC Breakfast Show

starts at 18min15sec

Oooh! Thanks Ariantes  :clap:
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wingit4me
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« Reply #44 on: October 08, 2011, 09:23:51 AM »

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/theticket/2011/1007/1224305361793.html

The Irish Times - Friday, October 7, 2011
Norn Iron man

It seems like destiny that Lisburn giant Ray Stevenson ended up a mainstay of comic-book films. The king of large parts (the latest as Porthos in The Three Musketeers ) tells TARA BRADY how it started with a fat suit

STANDING at 6ft 4in, it’s not surprising that Lisburn-born Ray Stevenson has become a player in the Marvel universe. It’s just a wonder they ever managed without him. At 47, the star of Punisher: War Zone and Thor has finally been moulded into enough action figures to mount a war on himself.

“Action roles are the only thing that keeps me fit,” says Stevenson. “I hate the gym. I can’t do the matching socks and tops at all. As long as I keep working on a film I’m pacing myself and training. In between times I am a lazy, lazy bugger.”

Happily, there aren’t many “in between times”. On rare days off he can be found globetrotting with his two young sons – four-year-old Leonardo and five month-old Sebastiano – and his intrepid domestic partner, the Italian anthropologist Elisabetta Cariacca.

“It’s a life choice for us and the two wee boys,” explains dad. “We’re gypsy souls. Before Leonardo was one he had been on 21 planes to Hawaii and Maui and LA. People in the States are always amazed. They say, ‘Oh my God, you live in Ibiza. How far away is that?’ But it’s only 2½ movies and a meal.”

Jason Statham has gung-ho geezer-fu chic, but Stevenson may be the Last Great Action Hero . The actor’s imposing physique has made him ideal casting for such hard men of yore as Rome’s Titus Pullo and as Dagonet, a Knight of the Round Table in Antoine Fuqua’s King Arthur .

Who else was Paul WS Anderson, director of Resident Evil , going to call on for Porthos in his new adaptation of The Three Musketeers? “I really just chase the directors and actors I admire and I look for ensemble pieces where you’re more likely to find a good character role. And I loved the intense energy of this and the strong visual. It’s the first film to be conceived and designed as a 3D movie from the drawing board since Avatar.”

Anderson was fortunate that the actor could fit him in. Earlier this year, Stevenson headed up a cast that included Christopher Walken and Val Kilmer on the Irish- American mob epic Kill the Irishman . He’s currently shooting GI Joe 2: Retaliation with Bruce Willis and Dwayne Johnson.

“I’ve just finished on a movie called Jayne Mansfield’s Car with John Hurt,” he says proudly. “Other people have to remind me. When you’re shooting a movie with Denzel Washington and Gary Oldman, it’s amazing, but you’re in a professional setting. Your job is to bring it. Their job is to bring it. And you tend to forget who they are. Then someone says their names and you think ‘Oh my God’.”

His gilded Hollywood career is no fluke. Stevenson, a classically trained actor and a graduate of Bristol’s Old Vic Theatre School, came to the profession late but determined.

“I was 25 before I decided to try. But if I’d done it any earlier I wouldn’t have been ready emotionally. If I’d left it until my 30s it would have been too late. So at 25, I knew I had to give it a shot. I didn’t know why. I was jacking in my career for a profession with no guarantees.”

It took John Malkovich to convince him.

“I saw him in Lanford Wilson’s Burn This . There was just something in that play made me realise that there’s a validity to acting, to the profession. It’s not just a culture of celebrities and celebritising. It is worthwhile.” But he still had to tell his dear old mum from the west of Ireland the good news.

“I had to sit her down and explain, ‘Oh, I’m going to live in abject poverty again so that I can follow a dream.’ And she just said the opposite of what I expected anyone to say. She said ‘follow your heart’. I was waiting for ‘Don’t be so stupid’.”

He was “fresh out of the coop” when he landed his first film role in Paul Greengrass’s The Theory of Flight . His co-star Kenneth Branagh, in a neat piece of symmetry, was his director on early summer sensation Thor.

“Ken called me up out of the blue. And I was so pleased, because he said ‘I’ve been admiring your work from afar all these years and I’m so thrilled how your career is going. So I’d like to put you in an enormous fat suit. You’re a big strapping lad’.”

It’s been an interesting career between Branagh collaborations. Long before Stevenson was attempting to outfox Will Ferrell in The Other Guys , he was earning positive notices for the 2003 Royal National Theatre production of The Duchess of Malfi . Before that, he was an ITV regular on Peak Practice and Band of Gold . Before that, he was an interior designer.

Hang on. The Punisher worked as an interior designer? “It was interior architecture, really. It wasn’t throws and cushions. It was spatial design and projections. After I got into acting I realised that what I was doing was a kind of theatre. It’s a theatre of space. And it was really useful training. There’s not a lot of magic on a film set. You’ve got to design a fourth wall in your head so can believe you’re not just staring at puffy jackets.”

Stevenson, whose Irish mother and RAF father relocated the family to Newcastle-Upon-Tyne when he was eight, is proud of his Celtic heritage and still does what his Irish mammy says. “She told me I should do Kill the Irishman , and I said, ‘Hang on, I haven’t even read it yet.’ But according to her ‘these true life stories are always brilliant’. So she took the script to read it herself. I’ve created a monster. Every time she sees a film she likes, she’s on the phone asking: ‘And why weren’t you in that?’”

The Three Musketeers 3D opens October 12
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