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Author Topic: Interviews  (Read 9081 times)
wingit4me
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« on: March 03, 2011, 07:33:09 PM »

http://www.g4tv.com/videos/51563/Kill-The-Irishmans-Ray-Stevenson-on-AOTS/#video-51580
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2011, 05:18:13 PM »

Excellent work, wing  :cheers: :clap: Good interview actually. A house in Ibiza, a spot of painting on the side... what a life! ( I don't see a 'jealous' smiley on here). :D
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mob1
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2011, 07:18:23 PM »



Great interview Ray  :clap: :clap:  Cept for the boots....are you going for the 70's look with them? Prolly.

Wonderful drawing of the interviewer, Ray is so talented... :crush: :loveys:

I am with you, Red, a house in Ibiza would be divine..never got there, just Malaga..but I hear it is lovely.  :rockon2:
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wingit4me
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« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2011, 08:40:44 PM »

If you goto the bottom of the page here there is a video interview..about more than the Punisher, it is more interesting than the written article

http://www.cinemablend.com/new/Ray-Stevenson-Could-Be-The-Punisher-Again-Has-Talked-With-Marvel-23555.html
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mob1
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« Reply #4 on: March 10, 2011, 01:28:39 AM »

Another Ray interview..this time in Cleveland..are you getting tired of him yet??? haha Me...never  :crush: watch Rick Porello the author of the book right after Ray. Lots of coverage and the film is not opening til Friday in 5 cities.


http://www.cleveland.com/moviebuff/index.ssf/2011/03/danny_greene_movie_kill_the_ir_1.html







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wingit4me
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2011, 08:06:39 AM »

http://www.irishcentral.com/ent/-A-man-you-dont-meet-every-day---Kill-the-Irishman-117794749.html?page=1

In Kill the Irishman, the by turns hilarious and terrifying portrait of the Irish American man who brought down the mafia, Ray Stevenson gives an unforgettable portrait of an unhinged underdog whose near insanity turns the crime world upside down. CAHIR O’DOHERTY talks to the principals involved in the riveting film.

People who have nothing to lose are the most dangerous people of all.  Having grown up knowing they matter to no one, they can take it into their heads that nothing else matters either.

In the new film Kill the Irishman we meet one such desperate man in the shape of Danny Greene (played by 46-year-old Lurgan, Co. Armagh-born Irish actor Ray Stevenson) the Irish American working class Cleveland boy who, despite the odds stacked against him, is determined to make a name for himself in the world.

Greene’s debut is literally explosive. In the summer of 1976, when Kill the Irishman is set, no less that 36 bombs explode in Cleveland as a turf war he set off rages between himself and the mob.

Now most betting people would give the advantage to the mob, and that’s why this film is so powerfully fascinating -- the mob loses.

Incredibly, Kill the Irishman, which opens this Friday, March 11, is based on the true story of how a fearless Irish American boy turned the tables on the famous loan shark Shonder Birns (played by a delightfully exasperated Christopher Walken) and stopped taking orders from the capos, instead striking out on his own power trip.

Greene’s enemies discover he has an almost Road Runner like ability to evade certain death, and it begins to unnerve them all.

Kill the Irishman isn’t just the film’s title; it’s the increasingly angry command from the crime bosses. Soon they begin to suspect he’s getting supernatural help and his legend is born.

But where does a man like Danny Greene, who studied Irish history voraciously and insisted that all his associates do the same, come from? In the film the answer is simple -- he comes from a predominantly Italian neighborhood where, between the ages of 12 and 16 he had a fistfight with the neighbors every single day.

“He was an underdog in a town full of them,” says Jonathan Hensleigh, the film’s writer and director (known for his work on Die Hard: With A Vengeance and Jumanji).

“Irish people are the only ones who see the deep connection between Danny Greene’s tough upbringing, where he lived his life every day like he had nothing to lose, and the terrifying casualness he had about life and death later on.”

Greene wore green clothes, drove green cars and hung a green crucifix around his neck. It was as if he wanted to bamboozle his enemies by being Irish on stilts.

A former marine, he was polite to a fault. It was “yes sir” and “no sir” until you looked in his eyes and saw a man who would ruthlessly coerce you at the merest sign of resistance.

Because Greene saw himself as the ultimate underdog who had been abused and exploited by others in his own community out to line their own pockets, he took a special shine to Irish history because, with its narrative of invasion and exploitation, in a way it mirrored his own.

“Did he get into all this Celtic warrior stuff? Not so much. It was more a case of seeing how the Irish had thrown off their oppressors. He enjoyed that,” says Hensleigh.

The Irish weren’t powerful, but they had smarts. It’s why Greene made his honchos read Irish history books.

Somehow Greene managed to survive the all the countless assassination attempts made by the mob, and he bumped off anyone who went after him in retaliation. But it was Greene’s utter fearlessness that mystified his enemies, and misjudging him at every turn eventually led to the collapse of the mafia syndicates across the U.S., earning Greene the title of the man the mob couldn’t kill.

Stevenson, most famous for his electrifying performance as Titus Pullo in HBO’s Rome, agrees that Greene drew inspiration from Irish history.

“He used his own money to subsidize the education of orphans, he bought 50 turkeys for the poor on Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. But if he found a way to help and at the same time stick it to his enemies, he’d go that route instead. He was a gangster, he wasn’t Robin Hood,” Stevenson told the Irish Voice.

Hensleigh says that in researching the life of his subject he was amazed, time and time again, by the conflicting aspects of Greene’s character.

“Look, this guy was a murderer. The film is not suggesting he was a hero. But we do strike a balance between the things he did for people. He’s a complex, multilayered individual and the film brings that out.”

Moviegoers unfamiliar with Greene’s life and legacy might not be aware of how pitch perfect Stevenson’s performance actually is. The surface details are all exactly like the real man’s right down to the thinning hair, the handlebar mustache and the groovy 1970s shirt collars.

But Stevenson goes far beyond the surface details in an indelible performance that will amaze you. One moment you find yourself rooting for him, even cheering, and the next you want to see him locked away for life.

“Each of the actors in this film are lead actors, but there’s no scene stealing going on. I was amazed by the style and the skill I saw all around me. It was a real collaboration between everyone involved,” says Stevenson.

“ We didn’t tell the story like a documentary; we looked for the truth of this journey and this world. If you believe in this journey then my job is done.”

Shonder Birns’s niece introduced herself to Stevenson at the film’s premiere in Palm Springs last week, which made him realize how close in time the film was to the actual events.

“This man brought down the five main mafia families and they never recovered from it. So it was strange to meet her in that sense. We’re doing a screening in Cleveland next, and I’m a little concerned about how it will go to be honest!” said Stevenson.

Shooting the film on the mean streets of Detroit as a stand in for Cleveland was a major eye opener for Stevenson.

“Our film trucks got shot at and had eight bullet holes in them. We saw a man get shot in the neck near the projects and he had to wait for 40 minutes before the ambulance arrived,” he said.

“Then they had to wait 40 minutes for the cops to arrive for an escort to pick him up. The people in the projects didn’t want him to survive. That was the kind of daily event there that blew my mind.”

In the role of Greene, Stevenson says he knew he was dealing with the fact that everywhere his character went, people had a preconceived opinion of him. He’d always been an underdog and it could be quite isolating and lonely. He had to live on his own all the time.

Says Stevenson, “But he wasn’t altruistic, he wasn’t a Robin Hood figure either. He did things here and there to make some people happy and to piss others off.”
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wingit4me
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« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2011, 08:40:42 AM »

http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=74982

(link to this may have been posted before ....sorry for redundancy)

Hey Brit, this is the one I was saying is my favorite of the interviews with Ray so far.  Keep track of it so when you get your cable service straightened out you can watch it. :)
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Labiaofthejulii
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« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2011, 10:25:25 AM »

I love all the interviews  :yahoo:   :dance2:   :clap:

Tis high time I had Ray on the floor. Oops I mean high time Ray had the floor *snork*
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And all because the lady loves... Ray

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mob1
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« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2011, 11:16:27 PM »

Wing, the reviews aren't posted under 'interviews" you might want to check "Reviews" to see if they are posted. This thread is for "Interviews".
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mob1
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« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2011, 11:34:02 PM »

BBC America does a quick interview with Ray...and he looks the best here IMO..BBCA asks "Can this Be Ray's Big Year?" We hope so!!!

http://blogs.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2011/03/11/could-2011-be-rome-star-ray-stevensons-big-year/
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Lotis
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« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2011, 09:40:52 AM »

And the raydio interviews are on the website. I've added a couple more in the past few days.  :rap:


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wingit4me
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« Reply #11 on: March 14, 2011, 03:42:24 PM »

And the raydio interviews are on the website. I've added a couple more in the past few days.  :rap:


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Thank you Lotis.
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wingit4me
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« Reply #12 on: March 17, 2011, 09:34:35 PM »

http://detnews.com/article/20110317/ENT02/103170303/1034/ent/‘Irishman’-star-leads-with-fists

'Irishman' star leads with fists
Tom Long / Detroit News Film Critic
Ask Ray Stevenson if he's ever starred in a film where he didn't punch someone and it doesn't take long for him to laugh and come up with the answer.
"Let's see … no, pretty much," he admits. "In some weird way I kind of end up playing sexy hedonists with a tendency towards violence."
Advertisement

"I put the word sexy in there," he admits.
At a muscular six-foot-four inches it's easy to see why Stevenson gets cast in physical roles. He first caught American eyes playing a faithful knight in 2004's "King Arthur" and then wowed critics as the brutal but loyal Roman warrior Titus Pullo in HBO's epic series "Rome."
Since then he's broken jaws as the title character in "Punisher: War Zone" and hunted Denzel Washington in "The Book of Eli." Now he stars in the Detroit-made true gangster story "Kill the Irishman," opening this weekend.
In it, he plays Danny Greene, an Irish dock worker in Cleveland who rises through union connections to become a mobster so brash he faced off with the Italian Mafia, setting off a rash of car-bomb assassinations in the '70s.
Empathy for bad guys
"I really don't think people wake up in the morning thinking they're going to be a bad guy," Stevenson, 45, says on the phone from Los Angeles.
"Maybe they've been slapped down and thwarted through social pressures and they don't have the right background, so they've actually been blocked and not given the right education or the right environment to nurture and grow," Stevenson says.
"You get the feeling society doesn't care about you," he says. "So why should you care about it."
Like many large men who make a living pretending to punch and kill people in movies, Stevenson has an outside hobby.
Hunting? Fishing? Boxing? Sky-diving?
Try painting with water colors. Stevenson has actually had exhibits of his work over the years, but he's put that behind him.
"I kind of realized I didn't want to spend the time getting 16 pieces ready for a September gallery, I wanted to spend the rest of my life learning how to paint," says the actor, who actually was born in northern Ireland but brought up in Britain's northeast.
"Everybody needs something, some place where it's about being selfish, it's about that island of selfness," Stevenson says of his painting.
"It's only colored mud, but there is something about it," Stevenson says.
Detroit a 'war zone'
"Kill the Irishman" was shot in some of the rougher parts of Detroit and Stevenson is frank with his thoughts on the area.
"It's a war zone. It's basically a blatant, weeping wound of what is actually happening in a broader scale all across America," he says.
"You've got all the energy and the might of the car industry and the history of Motown and all this other stuff, and yet it's burned out, bombed out, boarded up.
"People aren't being taken care of," he says.
Likes the taste of icing
Hollywood is certainly taking care of Ray Stevenson these days. Following "Kill the Irishman" he has a role in the summer blockbuster "Thor," and then follows that playing Porthos in the latest revival of "The Three Musketeers."
Is he successful?
"If you make your living as an actor, then you're successful," he says. "I regard this as a privilege and a great fortune.
"Whether you can buy a bigger car or a bigger house or fly around the world, that's the icing on the cake; but the cake, the real thing, that's what matters."
Has he tasted much of the icing?
"Well, I'm developing a bit of a sweet tooth," Stevenson says with a laugh.
"But the icing would be nothing if the cake wasn't there."
Tlong@detnews.com
(313) 222-8879


From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110317/ENT02/103170303/‘Irishman’-star-leads-with-fists#ixzz1GvG6Yhen
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:wingit:
Camamar
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« Reply #13 on: March 18, 2011, 07:17:01 PM »

http://detnews.com/article/20110317/ENT02/103170303/1034/ent/‘Irishman’-star-leads-with-fists

'Irishman' star leads with fists
Tom Long / Detroit News Film Critic
Ask Ray Stevenson if he's ever starred in a film where he didn't punch someone and it doesn't take long for him to laugh and come up with the answer.
"Let's see … no, pretty much," he admits. "In some weird way I kind of end up playing sexy hedonists with a tendency towards violence."
Advertisement

"I put the word sexy in there," he admits.At a muscular six-foot-four inches it's easy to see why Stevenson gets cast in physical roles. He first caught American eyes playing a faithful knight in 2004's "King Arthur" and then wowed critics as the brutal but loyal Roman warrior Titus Pullo in HBO's epic series "Rome."
Since then he's broken jaws as the title character in "Punisher: War Zone" and hunted Denzel Washington in "The Book of Eli." Now he stars in the Detroit-made true gangster story "Kill the Irishman," opening this weekend.
In it, he plays Danny Greene, an Irish dock worker in Cleveland who rises through union connections to become a mobster so brash he faced off with the Italian Mafia, setting off a rash of car-bomb assassinations in the '70s.
Empathy for bad guys
"I really don't think people wake up in the morning thinking they're going to be a bad guy," Stevenson, 45, says on the phone from Los Angeles.
"Maybe they've been slapped down and thwarted through social pressures and they don't have the right background, so they've actually been blocked and not given the right education or the right environment to nurture and grow," Stevenson says.
"You get the feeling society doesn't care about you," he says. "So why should you care about it."
Like many large men who make a living pretending to punch and kill people in movies, Stevenson has an outside hobby.
Hunting? Fishing? Boxing? Sky-diving?
Try painting with water colors. Stevenson has actually had exhibits of his work over the years, but he's put that behind him.
"I kind of realized I didn't want to spend the time getting 16 pieces ready for a September gallery, I wanted to spend the rest of my life learning how to paint," says the actor, who actually was born in northern Ireland but brought up in Britain's northeast.
"Everybody needs something, some place where it's about being selfish, it's about that island of selfness," Stevenson says of his painting.
"It's only colored mud, but there is something about it," Stevenson says.
Detroit a 'war zone'
"Kill the Irishman" was shot in some of the rougher parts of Detroit and Stevenson is frank with his thoughts on the area.
"It's a war zone. It's basically a blatant, weeping wound of what is actually happening in a broader scale all across America," he says.
"You've got all the energy and the might of the car industry and the history of Motown and all this other stuff, and yet it's burned out, bombed out, boarded up.
"People aren't being taken care of," he says.
Likes the taste of icing
Hollywood is certainly taking care of Ray Stevenson these days. Following "Kill the Irishman" he has a role in the summer blockbuster "Thor," and then follows that playing Porthos in the latest revival of "The Three Musketeers."
Is he successful?
"If you make your living as an actor, then you're successful," he says. "I regard this as a privilege and a great fortune.
"Whether you can buy a bigger car or a bigger house or fly around the world, that's the icing on the cake; but the cake, the real thing, that's what matters."
Has he tasted much of the icing?
"Well, I'm developing a bit of a sweet tooth," Stevenson says with a laugh.
"But the icing would be nothing if the cake wasn't there."
Tlong@detnews.com
(313) 222-8879


From The Detroit News: http://detnews.com/article/20110317/ENT02/103170303/‘Irishman’-star-leads-with-fists#ixzz1GvG6Yhen


 :D Ray sounds as though he has as big an ego as TitusPullo. Not that I disagree with the assessment.  :dance:

ALso....isn't Ray 46 now?  :cool2: ;D :think: :shutup:

:bead:
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A day without Ray is like a day without sunshine.....Worse, actually. A day without sunshine would save me having to put on sunscreen.
britmys
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« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2011, 06:37:49 AM »

http://www.comingsoon.net/news/movienews.php?id=74982

(link to this may have been posted before ....sorry for redundancy)

Hey Brit, this is the one I was saying is my favorite of the interviews with Ray so far.  Keep track of it so when you get your cable service straightened out you can watch it. :)

Thanks, wing.  I was able to cable internet yesterday, and watched the interview, which was a great one.  But what was with the stubble?  It made me wonder when it was taped.

:brit:
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